WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

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WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

NCEDSV defines domestic violence as a pattern of abusive and coercive behaviors in a relationship by a person to gain or maintain power and control over another: their intimate partner, spouse, or ex-partner or spouse. Domestic violence is physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats designed to control that intimate partner. NCEDSV’s definition is broader than the legal definition found in the Nevada Revised Statutes which focuses on physical abuse. If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence and need help, contact your nearest agency for assistance.

Physical Abuse is using physical force to control a partner. Physical abuse includes hitting/punching, slapping, shoving, grabbing, pinching, biting, hair pulling, using weapons, and other physically violent behaviors. Physical abuse also includes denying medical care and/or forcing alcohol/ illegal substance use upon a partner.

Sexual Abuse is forcing or coercing a partner to engage in unwanted sexual contact or behavior. Sexual abuse includes, but is certainly not limited to, marital/intimate partner rape, attacks on sexual parts of the body, forcing sex after physical violence has occurred, treating a partner in a sexually demeaning manner, and forced prostitution.

Emotional Abuse is an intentional undermining of an individual’s sense of self-worth and/or self-esteem through constant criticism, name-calling, playing emotional games to keep a partner in emotional turmoil, or damaging one’s relationship with her/his/their children.

Economic Abuse is using finances to control a partner. Economic abuse includes maintaining total control over financial resources, and/or withholding access to money. Additionally, partners may forbid or sabotage their partner’s employment or vocational education/school. Sabotage includes: calling or harassing their partner’s workplace, keeping their partner awake so they are too tired to work or study, turning off the alarm clock, or making sure the vehicle isn’t working.

Psychological Abuse includes causing fear by intimidation; threatening suicide, or harming their partner, children, or partner’s family or friends; destruction of pets and property; and gaslighting (making their partner question their sanity or reality).

Isolation is a tactic often used to by abusive partners by sabotaging relationships, moving away from friends and family, refusing to allow contact, monitoring phone calls, demanding their partner account for their whereabouts, and refusing to allow a victim to learn English.

+ Physical Abuse

Physical Abuse is using physical force to control a partner. Physical abuse includes hitting/punching, slapping, shoving, grabbing, pinching, biting, hair pulling, using weapons, and other physically violent behaviors. Physical abuse also includes denying medical care and/or forcing alcohol/ illegal substance use upon a partner.

+ Sexual Abuse

Sexual Abuse is forcing or coercing a partner to engage in unwanted sexual contact or behavior. Sexual abuse includes, but is certainly not limited to, marital/intimate partner rape, attacks on sexual parts of the body, forcing sex after physical violence has occurred, treating a partner in a sexually demeaning manner, and forced prostitution.

+ Emotional Abuse

Emotional Abuse is an intentional undermining of an individual’s sense of self-worth and/or self-esteem through constant criticism, name-calling, playing emotional games to keep a partner in emotional turmoil, or damaging one’s relationship with her/his/their children.

+ Economic Abuse

Economic Abuse is using finances to control a partner. Economic abuse includes maintaining total control over financial resources, and/or withholding access to money. Additionally, partners may forbid or sabotage their partner’s employment or vocational education/school. Sabotage includes: calling or harassing their partner’s workplace, keeping their partner awake so they are too tired to work or study, turning off the alarm clock, or making sure the vehicle isn’t working.

+ Psychological Abuse

Psychological Abuse includes causing fear by intimidation; threatening suicide, or harming their partner, children, or partner’s family or friends; destruction of pets and property; and gaslighting (making their partner question their sanity or reality).

+ Isolation

Isolation is a tactic often used to by abusive partners by sabotaging relationships, moving away from friends and family, refusing to allow contact, monitoring phone calls, demanding their partner account for their whereabouts, and refusing to allow a victim to learn English.

Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children who grow up witnessing domestic violence are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life, therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society’s next generation of victims and abusers.

Sources: National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Center for Victims of Crime, and WomensLaw.org.

These examples may not fit the legal definition under Nevada law. Read the legal definition here: www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-033.html#NRS033Sec017

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Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children who grow up witnessing domestic violence are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life, therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society’s next generation of victims and abusers.

Sources: National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Center for Victims of Crime, and WomensLaw.org.

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These examples may not fit the legal definition under Nevada law. Read the legal definition here: www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-033.html#NRS033Sec017

Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children who grow up witnessing domestic violence are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life, therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society’s next generation of victims and abusers.

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Sources: National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Center for Victims of Crime, and WomensLaw.org.

These examples may not fit the legal definition under Nevada law. Read the legal definition here: www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-033.html#NRS033Sec017

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Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children who grow up witnessing domestic violence are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life, therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society’s next generation of victims and abusers.

Sources: National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Center for Victims of Crime, and WomensLaw.org.

These examples may not fit the legal definition under Nevada law. Read the legal definition here: www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-033.html#NRS033Sec017

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large.

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